Ingrained Seasons

Posted: December 23, 2016 in free verse, poem, poet, poetry, writing
Tags: , , , , , ,

Dec. 21, winter solstice, first day of winter, the least amount of daylight, is called the shortest day of the year. Winter, the season that gets better from the very moment that it begins. Yes, although the temperatures may be more extreme, we will have more sunshine by a minute or two each day from now until summer begins on June 21 next year. We can start to enjoy winter because the days will now only get better. No wonder this day caught the eye of even the most ancient men. Every afternoon sitting in their cave watching the sun set farther and farther south causing less and less time during the day and more and more time in the darkness of night. More time spent guarding against the predators of the night and less time during the day spent hunting for food and shelter. They seriously wondered if the sun would return.

When did they realize that the sun could be depended on to finally ebb at its furthest reach and slowly begin travel of the reverse bringing with it needed daylight and warmth. I’m sure they celebrated this day as they watched the sun set and rise on the two landmarks they may have physically or mentally erected on the horizon. As should we. They could measure their stored food reserve and know that they would either have enough to last the remaining half of their most sparse days or not enough. They would know that their lean days and confinement would indeed end. Although the remaining days of the season may be hard, they would at least be measurable.

When I notice the sun shining through our south windows and reflecting from the glass doors on our old book-case, without looking at the calendar I know that we are approaching this season. Not as elaborate as Stonehenge but just as effective. And deep down in the core of me, I still feel a sense of relief that the growing darkness is contained and the sunshine will remain just a little longer each day. Although, my food supply is as close as our neighborhood grocery store and the fuel for my fire is delivered to me effortlessly, I have this innate feeling of relief on this day each year. A core feeling that is as surely as much the evidence of the remains of our ancient ancestors as the huge heavy stone pillars of Wiltshire or the small stone circles and charcoal of their ancient fires. The core feelings from the remains of their DNA memory. Their feelings of survival, relief and wonder are in me even though my life is now much easier.

The changing of the seasons are powerful events for man, events that their survival depended on. They mark celebrations, the beginning of tasks and the beginnings and endings of hot and cold climate and the abundance of food. Man is finely tuned to them. We are finely tuned to them because of the feelings and behaviors that were engraved into our DNA from early ancient man as they observed, learned and adapted to those predictable seasonal times.

I wonder what feelings and behaviors we are engraving into the DNA memory of future man from the powerful events of our days. We are not just leaving the ruins of our buildings, pottery, weapons and bones. We are leaving behind either the good knowledge or the ruins of our minds in our inherited DNA. Which of these, the knowledge or the ruins, from today’s events of our civilization will be ingrained and become innate behavior or feelings of our future man? What ingrained seasons will we pass on for them to celebrate from our DNA?

Such is the life of John

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Comments
  1. iampeacenow says:

    It is interesting how ancient man was very in tune to the seasons and the shortening and lengthening of the days and kept track of them. And even now we still note them in various ways. Wishing you and yours a wonderful Christmas and happy New Year. Peace to you

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Zakiah says:

    Such a thought provoking post! How did man know of having to collect, preserve for future use, the foods and the coal and the wood that he knew he was going to need? How do the squirrels know that they have to find their foods in the summer an falling of the year? What do people living in the southern hemisphere do, where the seasons do not change as drastically as they do here?
    How wonderful it would be to sit down and reflect on all these with someone knowledgeable like you.
    Great post. Merry Christmas and all that stuff!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Excellent, John!
    I love reading this! Your wise thoughts and important questions. I have those same questions, too.
    What we pass on is something to think about…as it is vital.
    Hope you had a wonderful Christmas!
    (((HUGS))) 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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